42 Week Course - 42 Assignments

ENROL NOW

Modules: Evaluating Evidence; Major Discoveries & Fundamental Concepts; Useful Maths; Space and the Universe; Our Planet; The Material Technological World; The Microscopic Word

Our weekly assignments invite students to explore essays, book chapters, news features, lectures, podcasts, videos and websites. Each assignment requires students to engage for approximately an hour, they vary in length depending on their difficulty. Lengthy book chapters allow for students to get deep into the text whilst short videos present more challenging material whilst leaving more time for thinking.


About the Course

The natural sciences is a fascinating and it is one that covers a very broad range of topics. This reading series contains a combination of videos, podcasts, articles and websites on a wide range of topics and at varying difficulties. This is to give you a feel for a both cutting-edge science and fundamental concepts across the breath of the subject. It aims to highlight recent scientific breakthroughs, demonstrate basic scientific principles and reveal key mathematics that will help you when studying science at university level. Though some of the articles may be tough, do persist to the end of them, trying to at least identify the key buzzwords and concepts. I encourage you to always think critically about the ideas that the material raises. The reading list begins with some general introductions to science, followed by different topics each week, which aim to be diverse, interesting and relevant. Finally, for the topics that interest you the most, research more!

"This reading list aims to highlight recent scientific breakthroughs, demonstrate basic scientific principles and reveal key mathematics that will help you when studying science at university level."

- Yolanda Ohene



Meet the Course Designer

Yolanda Ohene grew up in a small town in Derbyshire, worlds away from the physics labs at Imperial College London, where she completed her undergraduate degree. Her third year took her to France where she did a Masters research project. The project used an atomic force microscope - a tool that feels the surface of tiny objects – to study genetically modified bacteria, which over-produced fats and are used as a biofuel. She is currently studying for a PhD in biomedical imaging at University College London. Her research is developing a new MRI technique to explore how fluids move in the brain. Between undergraduate and postgraduate studies, she has worked on BBC science and engineering programmes and also enjoyed speaking at Cheltenham Science festival last summer.